What to bring to your no obligation consultation?

You’ve received a trigger for your legal concern  (a ticket, a Statement of Claim, a Termination notice,  an oral notice of a breach of contract,) and you’re looking into your options – including your right to fight and have booked a  no obligation consultation.   What should you bring with you? What is needed for you to find out the most and understand the situation best?

A no obligation consultation is exactly that, an opportunity for you to learn your options and rights about the challenge (s)  you face and the possible consequences to you. You are not committed to hiring our service and we may be advising you, based on your situation, to pay an amount, offer a settlement,  or otherwise act on your own behalf . We will try to give you as much accurate information as possible during the consultation, tailored to your specific circumstances.

To ensure you get the most accurate assessment of your situation, complete honesty is the first requirement. We need to know everything about the incident(s).   All information is kept strictly confidential.

Below we have listed some additional things that assist us during the consultation. The better the information we have, the better advice we can provide to you.

Documents (Or copies)

The first thing you need to bring – any documentation relating to your situation.  It could a lease agreement, a notice from the Landlord, a summons from an officer, an invoice from your contractor, a bounced cheque….whatever you have that relates to your concern.   It is better to bring too much than not enough, we help point out what is relevant to you.

Driver’s License/ Personal Identification

Unsurprisingly – you need to bring your identification.   Paralegals are regulated by the Law Society of Upper Canada (LSUC) and ID is required even for a consult under that regulatory scheme. You will also be asked your occupation, for the same reason.

All Court Dates and Correspondence

If you’ve gone to court on your behalf (or had someone else represent you) we need to know about them and what has happened at them so that we can know where your case currently sits. All letters and correspondence from the court are important for that same reason.

Disclosure/Evidence

You may have received documents from the court, from the other side or from third parties.

Any recordings or pictures

If you have any recordings, pictures or other evidence from the scene bring them in.

Any note you’ve made

In addition to recordings and pictures, notes are important to bring as they often have a clearer recollection then we have days or weeks later. Anything along these lines should be brought.

Yourself!

No one is more important for saying what happened then you! All of this is us working with you to help do whatever we can.